What can I say about fotofinity.net? 

While teaching in the Middle East, I hadn't been there very long when I realized that I needed some way of preserving some of the more fascinating sights (and sites)  I was encountering. I was, after all, in a completely different culture and I would definitely want to  provide some sort of show-and-tell on my return to the states. So, I bought a Kodak Brownie camera for twenty-five dollars from another ex pat who had finished her tour of duty and was headed back home. 

About two years after that, it was time for me to go home, too.   So I left the ME with  my Kodak Brownie and multiple pics in tow.  Once back in New York, I was looking forward to starting my new teaching job which I had managed to secure while still overseas. Things were just great!

But just when I was having a good time, Life intervenedI was informed by my boss that unless I completed the graduate work required above the already secured undergraduate degree, my job as a teacher in New York State could be forfeit.  

Since I had spent three years abroad,  I had only two remaining years in which to complete the additional thirty hours of graduate study in order to comply with the "within- five-years-of-graduation" certification requirement

Among all of the courses I took during that time, only two were worth taking: one was in Shakespeare and the other was in communications.   I had already been exposed to excellent teaching in the two undergraduate Shakespeare courses, (thank you, Dr. Rich), and looked forward to the one I was to take on the graduate level. 

At last I was approaching that longed for oasis within what had been a veritable  desert of graduate level gobbledygook.  Although just good and not great, this incarnation of Shakespeare did not disappoint. But on to photography and how I got there. 

The other course was in communications. The course grade would be based on a final project for which we were to choose a central topic, develop it and by using appropriate media,  present it to the entire class.

I don't know why I chose Hunger as my topic.  But a mainstay of the communications course was determining the "do-ability" of a given topic by asking two main questions:  Is there sufficient  information for developing the topic and, is it accessible.   .  when embarking on a project such as the one I was considering,two  elements (among others) are necessary. I knew that it was a subject  currently prominent in the media and assumed, correctly, that national periodicals with which our school library was well equipped  While it would be impossible to visit areas where truly devastating hunger and its effects could be observed firsthand, it was  a subject of general national relevance. Therefore,  I knew there had to be pictures in current periodicals on file in our school library.  and that there had to be a wealth of photos from which to choose once I decided what my "approach"  to the topic would be.

Obviously, it would be impossible to go to areas where truly devastating hunger and its effects could be observed.  But since it was now a generally relevant topic,  I knew there had to be pictures in current periodicals on file in our school library.  

Once I determined that this was true, I selected photos that were suitable.  I then took my twenty-five dollar Kodak Brownie camera and took pictures of the pictures! For lighting I used the sun.   I waited for a day on which the sun appeared to be brightest and placed the photos on a flat surface. I focused as well as I could using only the  Kodak Brownie lens that came with the camera. 

I had the film developed into slides which I arranged in sequence.   I then wrote a rather mournful song called "Child of Hunger".  I sang/recorded this song on cassette tape with a bass player and drummer providing the rhythm and background.

In that respect, the project was truly challenging but I welcomed it.  It was the opportunity to learn about the vast capability of a camera.  And, if I could successfully complete that project with a camera as elementary and basic as a Kodak Brownie, what could I achieve with a camera that was a little more sophisticated, one with more capability?  The opportunity to find out was just around the corner. 

At some point, the school district in which I was teaching decided it needed a public information person, one who could develop informational publications for distribution to taxpayers as to how their tax dollars were being spent.   I applied and got the job.  I was thrilled to discover that photography would be a vital ally in the development of informational brochures as well as other presentations.  

The district purchased a professional grade camera complete with a variety of lenses and allowed me to use the bathroom just off my office for setting up my own darkroom.  Even though I was limited to processing black and white film only, the addition of a Bogen enlarger allowed my photography education to really take off.

I began to see creative possibilities in just about everything I looked at.  It was as though the mind's eye that Emerson once spoke of had opened up wider than ever.    Over the years, my photographic efforts waxed and waned, ebbed and flowed as determined by the time allowed by life events.   And now that the urgent had been attended to, I was able to engage in the important.  And thus you have fotofinity.net, a way to share what I think are, debateably, of course,  some pretty good pix.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What can I say about fotofinity.net? 

While teaching in the Middle East, I hadn't been there very long when I realized that I had to have some way of preserving some of the more fascinating moments I was experiencing. I was, after all, in a completely different culture and I would definitely want to  provide some sort of show-and-tell on my return to the states. So, I bought a Kodak Brownie camera for twenty-five dollars from another ex pat who had finished her tour of duty and was headed back to the states.  About two years after that, it was time for me to go home.   So I left the ME with  my Kodak Brownie and multiple pics in tow. 

Once back in New York, I was looking forward to starting my new job which I had managed to secure while still abroad. Things were just great!

But just when I was having a good time, Life intervenedI was informed by my boss that unless I completed the graduate work required above the already secured undergraduate degree, my job as a teacher in New York State could be forfeit.  

Since I had spent three years abroad,  I had only two remaining years in which to complete the additional thirty hours of graduate study in order to comply with the "within five years of graduation" permanent certification requirement.

Among all of the courses I took during that time, only two were worth taking: one was a course in Shakespeare and the other was a course in communications.   I had already been exposed to excellent teaching in the two undergraduate Shakespeare courses, (thank you, Dr. Rich), and looked forward to the one I was to take on the graduate level. 

At last I was approaching that longed for oasis within what had been a veritable  desert of graduate level gobbledegook.  Although just good and not great, this incarnation of Shakespeare did not disappoint. But on to photography and how I got there. 

The other course was in communications. The grade for the course would be based on a final project for which we were to choose a central topic, develop it and by using appropriate media,  present it to the entire class.

I don't know why I chose Hunger as my topic.  I know that it was a subject  prominent in the media at the time and that there had to be a wealth of photos from which to choose once I decided what my approach would be.

Obviously, it would be impossible to go to areas where truly devastating hunger and its effects could be observed.  But since it was now a relevant topic generally, I knew there had to  be pictures  in the current periodicals on file in our school library.

Once I determined that this was true, I selected pictures that were suitable.  I then took my twenty-five dollar Kodak Brownie camera and took pictures of the pictures!  I had the film developed into slides which I arranged in sequence.   I then wrote a rather mournful song called "Child of Hunger".  I sang/recorded this song on cassette tape with a bass player and drummer providing the rhythm and background.

For lighting I used the sun.  I placed the photos on a flat surface, found an area where the sun was brightest on that particular day, and focused as well as I could with a Kodak Brownie camera lens.

In that respect, the project was truly challenging but I welcomed it.  It was the opportunity to learn about the vast capability of a camera.  And, if I could successfully complete that project with a camera as elementary and basic as a Kodak Brownie, what could I achieve with a camera that was a little more sophisticated, one with more capability?  The opportunity to find out about that was just around the corner.

At some point, the school district in which I was teaching decided it needed a public information person, one who could develop informational publications for distribution to taxpayers as to how their tax dollars were being spent.   I applied and got the job.  I was thrilled to discover that photography would be a vital ally in the development of informational brochures as well as other informational presentations.

The district purchased a professional grade camera complete with a variety of lenses and allowed me to use the bathroom just off my office for setting up my own darkroom.  Even though I was limited to processing black and white film only, the addition of a Bogen enlarger allowed my photography education to really take off.

I began to see creative possibilities in just about everything I looked at.  It was as though the mind's eye that Emerson once spoke of had opened up wider than ever.    Over the years, my photographic efforts waxed and waned, ebbed and flowed as determined by the time allowed by life events.   And now that the urgent has been tended to, I am able to engage in the important.  And thus you have fotofinity.net., a way to share what I think are pretty good pix.